Archive for April, 2012

Dusky Rose

Tuesday, April 3rd, 2012

My Sister and I took in a Piebald Pinto Pony Mare,Journey’s End, she blessed us with a Gruello Filly.   Gruello is a mousey greyish, smokey tan body color with dark slate grey to  charcoal black  points. Points being , legs, mane, tail and forelock.  Gruello is pronounced GRU- YO,  it is a Spanish word so the LL is Y .  Many people say this word wrong but, I would like to clarify this term for all my readers. not all double LL words are Y just those of a Spanish descent  :-)

We named her Dusky Rose.  She played with our children like a Dog.  She was extremely friendly and playful, we found a lovely home for her and her mother together. They had looked for a long time for the perfect horse to buy for their family. the little mare large pony, small horse size fit the bill just right and the filly and added bonus.

Journey's End

Tuesday, April 3rd, 2012

My Sister and I happened upon a family in need of placing a Pony they were unable to care for so, we of coarse, we wound up taking in the mild mannered large Pony Mare. And, helping the Family out with a bit of money. We chose the name Journey’s end, she had been purchased by them at a horse auction and were told she had been shipped South from another state.  She surprised us with a smokey colored Greullo Filly.  A coworker fell in love with the mare and filly, they had been searching for a horse and offered a great home for them. We agreed. to re-home the pair.

Ryan's Hope

Tuesday, April 3rd, 2012

I was looking for a Pony for my 2 yr. old Ryan, to ride and play with, combing the classified ads for a candidate.  I found a Shetland Pony Mare w/ Colt at her side for a very reasonable price. apparently nobody wanted the Colt to come with her.  His name, Ryan’s Hope. A very handsome chestnut and white pinto. He grew into a medium sized pony with a wonderful personality.

Misty Morning

Tuesday, April 3rd, 2012

Misty Morning was the cutest little dappled Shetland Pony Mare. She had been a lead Pony at Disney World’s  Fort Wilderness Stables.

Jahel

Tuesday, April 3rd, 2012

My neighbor called me in a panic, she had just heard of a barn auction being held of neglected Arabian Horses. She expressed her deep concern and wanted to drive to Ocala and check out the Horses.  So we planned on the next morning, we would get our Kids,  her two and my three off to school and heading Ocala to see the Horses. The morning chores and school routine sped by with out a hitch. We met at her house and started our hour & a half trek to the land of Horses.  Ocala is the Horse capitol of the World, having representation of more breeds than any other place in the World. The last periodical I read the consensus in, stated Horse breeding and or show farms  representing 50 different breeds.  And, 450 Thoroughbred Horse breeding farms.  Wow, right here in my native State, Florida, a mere 120 miles from my own little Horse farm. It is amazing to think that Horse Heaven is so close, yet, I only get there on very special occasions. The drive thru the rolling hills of gorgeous Horse country is nothing short of spiritual to a devout Hose lover such as myself.  back to the mission at hand. We arrived at the Horse farm mid morning and started our tour thru the numerous  Horse barns.  There was a mare barn, probably 20 stalls and large paddocks of each half on both sides. The center isle wide enough and tall enough to drive a large tractor pulling a big trailer right thru the middle with plenty of room to spare. The show barn set up the same way with many World Class Show Arabians housed within is expansive walls. The three Horses worth the most money had been led to back pond and shot, one Mare,  rumored to have sold for 3,000,000 in Scottsdale, Arizona a couple of years prior.  The Sheriff’s office had found them a couple days after the official seizure of the Animals had taken place.  One awesome Gelding stood 16hh , that is quite tall for  an Arabian Horse. He was the color of a brand new shine penny, sleek with muscles rippling under his perfect coat.  So many awesome horses, all being auctioned it was hard to know what to set y mind on bidding for.  We strolled thoughtfully through each barn, stopping to meet each and every horse. We were not  allowed to go into the paddocks with the mare, foal pairs to handle them, so we wrote notes on the printed farm guide as to which were friendly and came up to be petted.  There were rescue handlers there to answer questions as best they could. The last barn we came to, the Stallion barn filled with many stallions shown but many never bred. My friend sighed a long sigh and expressed her fear for theses horses above all.  She was certain that these unproven stallions would be in grave danger of no-one wanting an aged unproven stallion.  Oh, I knew little of the show world or breeding world on Arabian world for that matter.  My heart melted as I thought of theses older guys not getting homes and being sent to local auction, usually the meat market.  The Auction was set to be held on the following Monday, I was set to attend.  They started in the back barn with all the show horses.  And the first three World Class Show Horses, with points and pedigrees to die, for went for under 500.00 dollars.  I was so tempted to bid on one beautiful Gelding, he was dappled grey with black mane and tail. A handler jumped on him bareback just a halter and rope had him doing fancy gaits and precision turns, I was very impressed and wanted that horse so dang bad I was sweating but, I remained chased.  Thinking of the poor Stallions in the last barn that would really need me.  Then out of the crowd some “yahoo’ yelled out “what kinda friggin’ horse auction is this, people? Get your real money out these are great horses!”   The rest in that barn went for over 3000.00 each. My heart sank a bit, I felt very uninformed, misled and stupid at that point for NOT bidding on a horse I really liked.  I followed with the crowd as the announcers stand was set up in front of each barn listening and waiting for the stallion barn to be picked through. I had fallen in love with a handsome four year old white stallion with a long grey mane and tail.  I did not bid on any of the horses till it came his turn. I bid all the money I had plus the money from a friend to buy a horse for him as well.  The man from Illinois who had come for his son, to bid on that horse and that horse only out bid me.  I was crushed then the last horse rifled through the crowd cheered me to bid, I did and they got me excited about the fairytale looking beauty that pranced in the ring before us. they bid against me until my limit 3000.00 dollars. Then the guy tipped his hat and said ” He’s all yours ma’am”  and it was over all the horses were sold. I had spent my friends money on a fancy horse I had nowhere to keep.  Jahel  looked like a painting or a drawing, maybe an animated horse that Prince Charming would ride up on.  He was very gentle, I had not thought too much about housing him in the quick decision to add a fancy stallion to back yard herd.  We decided to board him until we could come to an agreement of our shared horse would be the best.  He had always been stalled with little turnout time. My herd live out 24/7 with only walk in feeder stalls. I owned a senior gelding that had not been gelded till late in life, many years of being  my herd leader.  He would not think well of a new stallion invading his herd. I would have to reinforce fences and geld Jahel before he could be introduced to my horses. I had no interest in breeding or showing at the time.  I only owned half a stallion and didn’t really have the money to buy out the other half.  Each month board was adding up on both our sides of ownership.  When breeders came around inquiring about his owners and offered a fair price, we came to the conclusion that it would be best to devolve the partnership and sell our dream horse to  the Arabian breeding farm that so desired him.  We sold Jahel, I cried and learned a very valuable lesson in the world of horse business.  Never buy without a lot of thought !!!

Brannigan

Tuesday, April 3rd, 2012

Brannigan belonged to my neighbors, they offered her to me and I bought her.   In 1984 I was 23 years old,  It had been my dream as a naive youngster to raise Appaloosa horses. I knew that dogs and cats were over bred and flooded the world with unwanted animals destined to be euthanized at the local dog pound and over crowded shelters but I had no idea that horses were in danger of finding sketchy to unsavory homes in a majority of the time. This broke my heart, obviously ruined my dream and further instilled the disdain felt towards my own species.  Brannigan delivered unto me the most beautiful filly I have ever seen. She was to be the first of my Breeding farms spotted offerings.  The progeny by  Warrior, one of my two breeding stallions and  Brannigan, one of my two mares.  No one wanted to buy horses, and got over whelmed as I took in unwanted horses as well as trying to start up a breeding farm and a feed store. Yet another childhood dream that I have yet to obtain.  Times quickly caught up with me, I thought by doing people a favor the Universe might in return throw me a bone…. I was very wrong.  I stopped breeding horses and tried to find homes for the ones that I had accumulated as I had more than our pastures could support. I thought I did my homework, I thought I checked out the adopters that I offered these healthy, completely vetted and hooves trimmed to.  One by one many became sad stories that I was unable to do anything about. My signed contracts meant nothing in a court of law.  Staving horses are “ok” if the owner has feed on the property and says they are feeding the horse back to health after a sickness.  Lawyer fees are outrageous and you won’t win, horses are property and the individual having possession at that time has the advantage.  When a contract of live animals is involved it would behoove the leaser/adopter/seller to write a 1200 page lots of small print addendum contract explicitly detailing the weight horses must be maintained at, the amount of and which brand of feed used. How many times a specific Farrier and Veterinarian must be called, procedure on any illness or injury.  I could go on and on, hating on the evils of homing an over abundance of the animals you thought you could help.  Organizations have huge legal fees and pay many experts to gain custody of the animals they seize it is no easy task and not one affordable by the average person.   Brannigan was a lovely horse and we enjoyed her company for 5 years, I did my best to place her in a loving home.  The family moved away with her. I have never seen her again.

Shane's Cochise Repeat

Tuesday, April 3rd, 2012

I won Shane in a 4H contest.  We got points to work, when not in the show ring, at the concession stand on Saturdays, during show season.  We got points for fund raising, educational exhibits in the County Fairs, attending each 4H meeting and giving demonstrations for club meetings.  At the end of the year we were instructed to write an essay telling what we would do with our filly if we won the registered filly contest.  I worked hard all year in the food stand, attended every meeting,  gave several demonstrations, sold the most candy and wrote a long essay about my beloved rescue horse, Jubilee, how much she meant to me and all the things, we two, had overcome together as a team, my wonderful horse and I.  I did not win the filly contest,but, I did win first pick of two colts that had been donated to the club that none of us 4Hers knew about. One a few spot Appaloosa colt and the other a solid Paint colt. Everyone assumed I would, of coarse, choose the Appaloosa colt, as Jubilee and my first horse Chief, were both Appaloosas. I did not, I chose the big liver chestnut colt that had been mangled by a marauding dog, when he was just a few days old. He survived the attack but never liked dogs again.  He was so special to me from the moment I saw him.  We bonded so deeply, I loved him like a boyfriend. He was one of very few horses my Mom really liked and one of very, very few my Dad did not like.  I taught him lots of tricks and taught him to ride completely by myself.  He would lay down, roll over, sit, count, shake hands, shake head for yes and no.  Soon after my first son, Danny was born in 1981 I happened to be playing with Shane in our front yard. A big pickup truck pulled into the drive way and watched me lay him down to get on easily sense I was riding bareback.

Little White Dove

Tuesday, April 3rd, 2012

Christmas 1975, the kids down the road each got a pony from Santa.  Three were brown and white pintos, one all brown and one little Shetland Pony mare, all white.  By February the newness had warn off, none were very obedient to the un-savvy owners. And soon the parents saw no reason to keep them. The kids led there unwanted ponies down the road, offering them for sale to each neighbor as they reached the houses one by one.  I of coarse, wanted all of them, but, my Dad would only agree to one. One for my little Brother to start riding.  So I chose very carefully, riding each one, then leading and handling their hooves. I had been delegated as the one to choose for my 8 year old Brother. I did not want to let my parents down in a selfish choice, so I made sure I was selecting for a small boy and not an experienced rider. After my assessment of the ponies, I confidently chose the little white mare as round as she was tall.  She was the perfect match for Charles to learn all about horse care and riding. We named her Little White Dove and affectionately called her new owner Running Bear.  He already thought he was Porter Rex and Shazam, now he be Running Bear as well, with his trusty steed Little White Dove.

Pumpkin Pie

Tuesday, April 3rd, 2012

My Brother’s first pony, a little tiny Shetland pony colt.  Looking back, with the horse knowledge I have now, he was probably Fallabella, (Miniature Horse) rather than Shetland.  He was not old enough to ride, we just played with him like a dog.  He had long fuzzy brown fur from head to toe. and sweet not a mean bone in his body.

Bay Lady

Tuesday, April 3rd, 2012

Left Brain Introvert all the way, the guy rode her with no halter or bridle, just hopped on and she went with his hand and leg cues.  Well that didn’t work for us she laid down on my Mom and scared her. her was stubborn with my Dad but he bought her for my Mother, as he already bonded to his mare Flicka.  We were unable to pair my Mother and Bay Lady, and sold her back to the previous owner. Bay Lady had a four month old colt by her side when we bought her.  Flicka took the colt from his mother and nurtured him as her own.  We kept the colt, Thunder, when we sold Bay Lady back.

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